Eurasia and Asia
Starting from 2013, the Valdai Discussion Club programme on Eurasia has been the flagship project for conceptualization and discussion the issues concerned with the Russia’s turn to the East. Since 2015, the Valdai Club has been considered to be the leading think tank on international cooperation in the Eurasian space. Each year the Club holds a series of events, such as the Asian Regional Conference, the Kazakh-Russian Expert Forum, the Russian-Chinese Conference, which bring together the acknowledged experts in their respective fields. Moreover, it takes part in the drawing up of the programme of the Eastern Economic Forum. All the events go hand-in-hand with in-depth analysis in the form of regular reports and papers. In 2018, the programme focuses on the development of the Comprehensive Eurasian Partnership and the Eurasian integration process. Another research field is the strengthening of Russia’s positions in the region through making practical recommendations to intensify Russian economic and political involvement in the regional cooperation.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director, Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics

PhD in political sciences, Saint Petersburg State University (1999). The coauthor of more than 200 analytical materials for public authorities of the Russian Federation concerning internal development of the European Union and the Russia-EU relations in 2004–2009. Аnalytical reviews were being prepared by a working group, comprising representatives of Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy (CFDF) and the Institute of Strategic Studies and Analysis (ISSA) and headed by Sergey Karaganov.

As a researcher specializes in Russian-European relations, foreign policy of the European Union, public-private relations in Europe, the European and international security. The author of the academic works published in Russia and abroad.
Between War and Diplomacy: Hybrid Foreign Policy in the Digital Age
The term ‘hybrid foreign policy’ turned out to be frequently used, but it remains too broad and vague. At the same time, this is an example of how little we know about processes linked with the development of digital technologies that have already been in place and posed a significant challenge to the entire world system. States have to apply the so-called ‘hybrid’ leverage where they run out of tools that traditional diplomacy is capable to provide. One of these tools are sanctions that have been undermining the established global institutional architecture. All the aforementioned present a unique threat, which can be compared to the nuclear breakthrough of the 20th century in its effect. Hence, it is essential to look into what is behind the ‘hybrid’ policy and how it influences the global stability.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director of Programmes at the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) 

He is responsible for the intellectual performance of RIAC, managing its programmes and projects. His personal background at RIAC includes working with Russian and foreign diplomats, governmental officials, experts, businessmen and NGO-leaders regarding Russia’s foreign policy and public diplomacy. Since 2015 he also heads Euro-Atlantic Security programme at the Valdai Discussion Club. 

Before joining RIAC, Ivan Timofeev was the Head of Analytical Monitoring Centre and Associate Professor at MGIMO University (2009–2011). He was awarded a doctoral degree in Political Science at MGIMO (2006).
Ivan Timofeev is an author and co-author of more than 70 publications, issued in Russian and foreign academic press. He is a member of editorial board at the Comparative Politics. He was elected as a Professor of the Academy for Military Science (2013).

Emerging Global Commons and Related Problems
One of the dominant global trends today is the widening gap between foreign policy driven by state’s pragmatic interests and the increasing global interdependence that entails problems which are impossible to solve on the nation-state level. On the one hand, there are so-called ‘Global Commons’, which importance is not disputed. It consists of some basic aspects, such as air, water, and biodiversity, but also encompasses global access to the social benefits gained by the humankind. On the other hand, the concept of Global Commons often contradicts the principle of state sovereignty. Supranational solutions, which were considered to be a remedy for all problems before, are not so commonly acceptable anymore as they are not shared in many parts of the world. That is why, the lack of new approaches to this question leads to growing conflicts over water resources, international migration, and environmental issues. Moreover, the maintenance of the Global Commons frequently runs contrary to the right of the poorest countries to develop since it cements the global North-South divide. Is it possible to reconcile these paradigms to ensure global peace and prosperity? 
Programme director:
Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Professor of MGIMO University; Professor of the Russian Academy of Sciences

As a programme director of the Valdai Club Foundation he is сoordinating the expert programme on Global Alternatives; Academic Director of the European Studies Institute at MGIMO University since 2015; Professor at School of World Economics and Global Politics at National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2009.

Previous positions: Lecturer, History faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University (1994–1996); Senior Research Fellow, Russian Institute for Strategic Studies (1997–2004); Associate Professor, Professor at MGIMO University since 2000; Head of Directorate for Research Policy at MGIMO University (2005–2008); Head of Department of EU Politics at European Studies Institute at MGIMO University (2007–2014).

Co-author of the Valdai Discussion Club publications on ‘Creating Central Eurasia’, on relations of Russia with China and U.S., on ‘nuclear fears’ after the Ukrainian crisis. Author of 6 research monographs.
The Future of War
The technological advancement alters the nature of war. The conflict between great powers is no longer an unlike scenario, since it is possible to win a war with less resources and without irreparable damage. The world is on the verge of a new era when the cutting-edge military technologies have not been tested on the battlefield, but have already been adopted by the leading powers. How will the conflict of tomorrow look like? Will the mechanism of deterrence be as effective as it is? What impact will it have on military alliances and diplomacy? Will the new non-proliferation regime emerge in regard to new technologies? For the great powers, the war is very precarious scenario, but still potential one.
Programme director:

PhD in Political Sciences, program director of the Valdai Club Foundation. He is the Head of the Laboratory of International Trends Analysis of the Moscow State Institute of International Relations. Founder and head of the Foreign Policy Advisory Group. 

The main topic of his research is the US foreign policy in international conflicts. In his studies, he is focused on the spheres of conflicting interests of Russia and the United States in Europe, the Middle East and the post-Soviet space. Key publications include the monographs "America’s Small Wars" (2014), "Essays on US Policy in the Regional Conflicts of the 2000s" (2014), and the collective monograph "Russia and the World in 2020" (2015). He is the editor of the annual forecast "International Threats".

He was a visiting professor and research fellow at Georgetown University (2007), Johns Hopkins University (2008), Guido Carli Free University of International Studies (2013), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (2015), Harvard University (2016) and Middlebury Institute for International Studies in Monterey (2017).

Member of the Russian International Studies Association, International Studies Association (USA) and member of the Working Group on the Future of Russian-American Relations.


Between Openness and Restrictions: Shifting Balance of Power and Russia’s Strategy in the Global Economy
The global economy undergoes dramatic changes in the balance of power. China assumes leadership in the global liberalization process, making massive investments in infrastructure projects around the globe. Russia devises a new strategy to confront the challenges linked with sanctions imposed against the country. It builds up a new network of alliances to take advantage of opportunities that the turn to the East and Eurasian integration projects open up. What does the new balance of economic powers bring about? Who will be able to benefit from it?
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Managing Director of Research - Chief economist, Eurasian Development Bank 

He worked in the International Monetary Fund, where he was Advisor to the Executive Director for the Russian Federation in Washington (2001–2004). Yaroslav Lissovolik joined Deutsche Bank as Chief Economist (2004); he became Head of Company Research in Russia (2009), and a member of the Management Board of Deutsche Bank in Russia (2011). Yaroslav Lissovolik is a member of the Advisory Council of the Central Bank of Russia, a member of the Council on foreign and defense policy and a member of the Bretton Woods Committee. Yaroslav Lissovolik became a member of the Expert Council of the Russian government as well as the Working group on macroeconomic policy of the Presidential Economic Council (2012). Since 2018 he is Managing Director of Research - Chief economist, Eurasian Development Bank.

He has published books on Russia's entry to the
WTO and on Russia's integration into the world economy, as well as numerous
articles and papers on economic and policy issues.
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Eurasia and Asia: development in a rapidly changing world
For its flagship project in 2014–2016, the Valdai Club studied the dynamics and prospects of forming a Greater Eurasia and its relationship with processes underway in the Asia-Pacific region. The Valdai Club first addressed this question in late 2013, anticipating many of the political changes that subsequently occurred. It has since conducted a vast amount of research and organized a series of high profile events aimed at translating those findings into action. With the situation in the U.S., Europe, and the world undergoing major changes, this issue takes on added importance and the Valdai Club continues to expand its network of related contacts and joint research activities.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director, Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics

PhD in political sciences, Saint Petersburg State University (1999). The coauthor of more than 200 analytical materials for public authorities of the Russian Federation concerning internal development of the European Union and the Russia-EU relations in 2004–2009. Аnalytical reviews were being prepared by a working group, comprising representatives of Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy (CFDF) and the Institute of Strategic Studies and Analysis (ISSA) and headed by Sergey Karaganov.

As a researcher specializes in Russian-European relations, foreign policy of the European Union, public-private relations in Europe, the European and international security. The author of the academic works published in Russia and abroad.
The transformation of Euro-Atlantic institutions: scenarios, risks, and opportunities
New political realities are exerting growing pressure on Euro-Atlantic institutions. In Europe, a system of asymmetric multi-polarity has de facto taken shape, increasing the risk of political tensions. NATO has once again cast itself as a tool for containing Russia, even while the Alliance itself experiences some uncertainty. The EU is discussing the creation of its own security structures, while the role of the OSCE – the only inclusive pan-European institution – has been undermined. The roles that Russia and Turkey play in the region are changing. The Euro-Atlantic policy of the U.S. remains unclear. Questions arise regarding possible institutional changes in Europe and the impact they would have on Russia, as well as the nature of the new system of European security.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director of Programmes at the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) 

He is responsible for the intellectual performance of RIAC, managing its programmes and projects. His personal background at RIAC includes working with Russian and foreign diplomats, governmental officials, experts, businessmen and NGO-leaders regarding Russia’s foreign policy and public diplomacy. Since 2015 he also heads Euro-Atlantic Security programme at the Valdai Discussion Club. 

Before joining RIAC, Ivan Timofeev was the Head of Analytical Monitoring Centre and Associate Professor at MGIMO University (2009–2011). He was awarded a doctoral degree in Political Science at MGIMO (2006).
Ivan Timofeev is an author and co-author of more than 70 publications, issued in Russian and foreign academic press. He is a member of editorial board at the Comparative Politics. He was elected as a Professor of the Academy for Military Science (2013).

U.S. policy and Russian-U.S. relations
United States domestic and foreign policy are both undergoing significant changes. With the election loss the U.S. political establishment suffered in 2016, the American domestic political philosophy began changing and the country’s political system has become the main arena for the struggle between supporters of the system that existed since the end of the Cold War, and the advocates of a new polycentric world whose contours remain unclear. U.S. foreign policy has consequently become more unpredictable while the country has entered a new phase of adaptation to a world that is changing largely at odds with its will and desires. Changes in U.S. policy alter the landscape of Russian-U.S. relations. Those relations are of critical importance to not only Russia’s foreign policy, but also international relations as a whole. U.S.-related issues have become a mandatory research focus for the Valdai Club, especially because the Russian-U.S. working group will resume its activities under the auspices of the Club.
Programme director:

Deputy Director at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow

Dmitry Suslov conducts research on various issues of international relations, including US foreign and domestic policy and Russia-US relations, Russian foreign policy, Russia-EU relations. He regularly consults the Russian government institutions and business enterprises on these and other issues. He is also a Senior lecturer at the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs of the National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2006, as well as Deputy Director for Research at the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy since 2004. Dmitry Suslov has co-authored several books (incl. The U.S. Policy in Asia Pacific (2014), Non-Military Instruments of the Russian Foreign Policy: Regional and Global Mechanisms (2012); Russia: a Strategy for the New World (2011); Russia vs. Europe. Confrontation or Alliance? (2009); Russia and the World. A New Epoch (2008); The World Politics (2008); The World Around Russia: 2017 (2007). At the Higher School of Economics (School of World Economy and International Affairs) he teaches courses on the US Domestic and Foreign Policy, Introduction to International Relations, Global Governance, US-Russia Relations, and Russia-EU Relations.

The global revolt: widespread social changes and their consequences for the world order
The events of 2016 – particularly Brexit and Trump’s electoral win – illustrate the deepening tensions in leading Western countries between the elite and ordinary citizens. The struggle between the established “globalization for the elite” and the growing demand for a “globalization for all” has made the emerging social and political transformation of the West increasingly central to the global agenda. Against this backdrop, the Valdai Club has formulated the concept of a “global revolt” against the status quo. This program analyzes the social and political causes of that “revolt,” the activity of new rightist and leftist political forces, and the ways in which forces of the “old world order” are reacting to this change.
Programme director:
Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Professor of MGIMO University; Professor of the Russian Academy of Sciences

As a programme director of the Valdai Club Foundation he is сoordinating the expert programme on Global Alternatives; Academic Director of the European Studies Institute at MGIMO University since 2015; Professor at School of World Economics and Global Politics at National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2009.

Previous positions: Lecturer, History faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University (1994–1996); Senior Research Fellow, Russian Institute for Strategic Studies (1997–2004); Associate Professor, Professor at MGIMO University since 2000; Head of Directorate for Research Policy at MGIMO University (2005–2008); Head of Department of EU Politics at European Studies Institute at MGIMO University (2007–2014).

Co-author of the Valdai Discussion Club publications on ‘Creating Central Eurasia’, on relations of Russia with China and U.S., on ‘nuclear fears’ after the Ukrainian crisis. Author of 6 research monographs.
New factors in global development and future challenges
The technological revolution in conjunction with socio-political changes around the world is altering the nature of traditional processes – from military action and diplomacy to systems of governance in individual states and the international community as a whole. The increasingly complex international order, coupled with the advent of powerful new technologies and processes, is permanently changing the face of the world. This research attempts to identify the outlines of those indefinite but emerging trends.
Programme director:

PhD in Political Sciences, program director of the Valdai Club Foundation. He is the Head of the Laboratory of International Trends Analysis of the Moscow State Institute of International Relations. Founder and head of the Foreign Policy Advisory Group. 

The main topic of his research is the US foreign policy in international conflicts. In his studies, he is focused on the spheres of conflicting interests of Russia and the United States in Europe, the Middle East and the post-Soviet space. Key publications include the monographs "America’s Small Wars" (2014), "Essays on US Policy in the Regional Conflicts of the 2000s" (2014), and the collective monograph "Russia and the World in 2020" (2015). He is the editor of the annual forecast "International Threats".

He was a visiting professor and research fellow at Georgetown University (2007), Johns Hopkins University (2008), Guido Carli Free University of International Studies (2013), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (2015), Harvard University (2016) and Middlebury Institute for International Studies in Monterey (2017).

Member of the Russian International Studies Association, International Studies Association (USA) and member of the Working Group on the Future of Russian-American Relations.


The Russian economy in the face of evolving external challenges
The Russian economy remains highly dependent on external factors. It is therefore vitally important to understand any changes in those factors – from the global order and rules of the game to relations with such major world players as the U.S., China, and Japan. Another pressing concern is the vulnerability of the Russian economy – particularly the federal budget and capital flows – to external shocks. The acute shortage of drivers of economic growth necessitates a more effective use of foreign economic policy, including integration projects, as a means for spurring growth.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Managing Director of Research - Chief economist, Eurasian Development Bank 

He worked in the International Monetary Fund, where he was Advisor to the Executive Director for the Russian Federation in Washington (2001–2004). Yaroslav Lissovolik joined Deutsche Bank as Chief Economist (2004); he became Head of Company Research in Russia (2009), and a member of the Management Board of Deutsche Bank in Russia (2011). Yaroslav Lissovolik is a member of the Advisory Council of the Central Bank of Russia, a member of the Council on foreign and defense policy and a member of the Bretton Woods Committee. Yaroslav Lissovolik became a member of the Expert Council of the Russian government as well as the Working group on macroeconomic policy of the Presidential Economic Council (2012). Since 2018 he is Managing Director of Research - Chief economist, Eurasian Development Bank.

He has published books on Russia's entry to the
WTO and on Russia's integration into the world economy, as well as numerous
articles and papers on economic and policy issues.
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Eurasia in the 21st century: Russia’s role and prospects for the future
The emergence of Eurasia as a unified interdependent entity is a complex process reflecting both the logic of regional development and global trends towards the ‘new regionalism’. Nevertheless, the process of Eurasian regional integration is subject to complex and contradictory ambitions, with the possibility of achieving significant public goods for Eurasia itself as well as for the region’s partners in greater Europe and greater Asia. Eurasia is currently one of the strategic directions for Russian development. The programme focuses on discussion of models of development for a new Eurasia and its possible configurations.  
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director, Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics

PhD in political sciences, Saint Petersburg State University (1999). The coauthor of more than 200 analytical materials for public authorities of the Russian Federation concerning internal development of the European Union and the Russia-EU relations in 2004–2009. Аnalytical reviews were being prepared by a working group, comprising representatives of Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy (CFDF) and the Institute of Strategic Studies and Analysis (ISSA) and headed by Sergey Karaganov.

As a researcher specializes in Russian-European relations, foreign policy of the European Union, public-private relations in Europe, the European and international security. The author of the academic works published in Russia and abroad.
The Middle East: An arena of confrontation or collective action?
As old ties in the region are being broken and new relations emerge, the crisis of statehood has entered the stage of the de facto disintegration of states, a ‘war of all against all’, the shaping of new political and military realities, and the possible creation of new states on the ruins of the Sykes-Picot system, whose hundredth anniversary will be marked this year. The scourge of radical Islamism is spreading across the world, affecting Europe and Russia as well as many other countries which have become the subject of terrorist attacks. The objective of this thematic strand is to research the fundamental dynamics of developments in the region, the impact of the Middle East crisis on Russia and Eurasia, to identify the most probable scenarios, as well as to outline potential solutions. The factors shaping Russia’s approach to regional crises and challenges will be an important part of this programme.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director of Programmes at the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) 

He is responsible for the intellectual performance of RIAC, managing its programmes and projects. His personal background at RIAC includes working with Russian and foreign diplomats, governmental officials, experts, businessmen and NGO-leaders regarding Russia’s foreign policy and public diplomacy. Since 2015 he also heads Euro-Atlantic Security programme at the Valdai Discussion Club. 

Before joining RIAC, Ivan Timofeev was the Head of Analytical Monitoring Centre and Associate Professor at MGIMO University (2009–2011). He was awarded a doctoral degree in Political Science at MGIMO (2006).
Ivan Timofeev is an author and co-author of more than 70 publications, issued in Russian and foreign academic press. He is a member of editorial board at the Comparative Politics. He was elected as a Professor of the Academy for Military Science (2013).

War and security in the 21st century
In conditions of growing confrontation, the role of military power in international politics is growing. Those who possess military power strive to improve their capacities and are finding new ways to deploy their forces. At the same time, co-operative elements have not disappeared, and there remains significant potential to find new forms of engagement and conflict resolution. This poses the question of establishing a new global security regime and maintaining strategic stability. The objective of this programme is to analyse the transformation of military power, new forms of its use, its potential as a foreign policy tool, and to explore new opportunities for trust building and risk minimisation.
Programme director:

PhD in Political Sciences, program director of the Valdai Club Foundation. He is the Head of the Laboratory of International Trends Analysis of the Moscow State Institute of International Relations. Founder and head of the Foreign Policy Advisory Group. 

The main topic of his research is the US foreign policy in international conflicts. In his studies, he is focused on the spheres of conflicting interests of Russia and the United States in Europe, the Middle East and the post-Soviet space. Key publications include the monographs "America’s Small Wars" (2014), "Essays on US Policy in the Regional Conflicts of the 2000s" (2014), and the collective monograph "Russia and the World in 2020" (2015). He is the editor of the annual forecast "International Threats".

He was a visiting professor and research fellow at Georgetown University (2007), Johns Hopkins University (2008), Guido Carli Free University of International Studies (2013), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (2015), Harvard University (2016) and Middlebury Institute for International Studies in Monterey (2017).

Member of the Russian International Studies Association, International Studies Association (USA) and member of the Working Group on the Future of Russian-American Relations.


Regionalisation of the world and the new type of interdependence
The emergence of trade mega-blocs on the one hand and increasingly obvious impact of politics on the economic processes on the other, signal the end of ‘universal’ globalisation of the sort previously based on the WTO and some other institutions of international governance. The combination of economic interdependence and geopolitical rivalry shapes a new type of international associative life and creates new interstate groupings that are both more exclusive that the earlier ‘universal’ institutions and more explicitly tied to geopolitical configurations. The objective of this programme is to research the possibility of new approaches to cooperation in a world that is fragmented but ultimately integral in principle and substance. The analysis will also focus on ways of managing contradictions and minimising mutual harm when economic conflicts arise.
Programme director:

Deputy Director at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow

Dmitry Suslov conducts research on various issues of international relations, including US foreign and domestic policy and Russia-US relations, Russian foreign policy, Russia-EU relations. He regularly consults the Russian government institutions and business enterprises on these and other issues. He is also a Senior lecturer at the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs of the National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2006, as well as Deputy Director for Research at the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy since 2004. Dmitry Suslov has co-authored several books (incl. The U.S. Policy in Asia Pacific (2014), Non-Military Instruments of the Russian Foreign Policy: Regional and Global Mechanisms (2012); Russia: a Strategy for the New World (2011); Russia vs. Europe. Confrontation or Alliance? (2009); Russia and the World. A New Epoch (2008); The World Politics (2008); The World Around Russia: 2017 (2007). At the Higher School of Economics (School of World Economy and International Affairs) he teaches courses on the US Domestic and Foreign Policy, Introduction to International Relations, Global Governance, US-Russia Relations, and Russia-EU Relations.

Russia and the EU in a changing Europe
The old model of relations between Russia and the European Union has run out of steam, but both sides face serious development problems, which force them to revisit their strategies. The programme objective is to try to understand how Russia-EU relations could look after the current crisis.
Programme director:
Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Professor of MGIMO University; Professor of the Russian Academy of Sciences

As a programme director of the Valdai Club Foundation he is сoordinating the expert programme on Global Alternatives; Academic Director of the European Studies Institute at MGIMO University since 2015; Professor at School of World Economics and Global Politics at National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2009.

Previous positions: Lecturer, History faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University (1994–1996); Senior Research Fellow, Russian Institute for Strategic Studies (1997–2004); Associate Professor, Professor at MGIMO University since 2000; Head of Directorate for Research Policy at MGIMO University (2005–2008); Head of Department of EU Politics at European Studies Institute at MGIMO University (2007–2014).

Co-author of the Valdai Discussion Club publications on ‘Creating Central Eurasia’, on relations of Russia with China and U.S., on ‘nuclear fears’ after the Ukrainian crisis. Author of 6 research monographs.
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Security and War Studies
Dedicated to researching contemporary trends in the analysis of conflicts – civil, international and hybrid conflicts. The main area of emphasis is the differences between Western and non-Western approaches to such notions as “stability”, “development”, “conflict”, “democracy”, “progress”, and “security”.
Programme director:

PhD in Political Sciences, program director of the Valdai Club Foundation. He is the Head of the Laboratory of International Trends Analysis of the Moscow State Institute of International Relations. Founder and head of the Foreign Policy Advisory Group. 

The main topic of his research is the US foreign policy in international conflicts. In his studies, he is focused on the spheres of conflicting interests of Russia and the United States in Europe, the Middle East and the post-Soviet space. Key publications include the monographs "America’s Small Wars" (2014), "Essays on US Policy in the Regional Conflicts of the 2000s" (2014), and the collective monograph "Russia and the World in 2020" (2015). He is the editor of the annual forecast "International Threats".

He was a visiting professor and research fellow at Georgetown University (2007), Johns Hopkins University (2008), Guido Carli Free University of International Studies (2013), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (2015), Harvard University (2016) and Middlebury Institute for International Studies in Monterey (2017).

Member of the Russian International Studies Association, International Studies Association (USA) and member of the Working Group on the Future of Russian-American Relations.


The Contemporary State
Dedicated to researching the transformations of the modern state as a political institution and a key actor in international relations. The programme focuses on such issues as regime change, the transformation of state sovereignty and of methods of state interventionism in the economy and citizens’ private lives, contemporary bureaucracy and mechanisms of social control over bureaucracy, the state’s competitors for the monopoly of power, and the correlation between organisation of the state and its foreign policy.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director of Programmes at the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) 

He is responsible for the intellectual performance of RIAC, managing its programmes and projects. His personal background at RIAC includes working with Russian and foreign diplomats, governmental officials, experts, businessmen and NGO-leaders regarding Russia’s foreign policy and public diplomacy. Since 2015 he also heads Euro-Atlantic Security programme at the Valdai Discussion Club. 

Before joining RIAC, Ivan Timofeev was the Head of Analytical Monitoring Centre and Associate Professor at MGIMO University (2009–2011). He was awarded a doctoral degree in Political Science at MGIMO (2006).
Ivan Timofeev is an author and co-author of more than 70 publications, issued in Russian and foreign academic press. He is a member of editorial board at the Comparative Politics. He was elected as a Professor of the Academy for Military Science (2013).

Globalisation and Regionalisation: the Changing Global Environment
Focuses on studying mainstream development trends of the world economy and international relations, which are changing the configuration of the global economic and international political environment and, consequently, the factors with the greatest impact on state politics and the patterns and models of international relations. Considerable attention is paid to the complex and nonlinear combination of globalisation and regionalisation trends in the world economy and politics, and the competitive and collaborative relations between global and regional, Western and non-Western, hard-line and flexible, and formal and informal tools of global governance.
Programme director:

Deputy Director at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow

Dmitry Suslov conducts research on various issues of international relations, including US foreign and domestic policy and Russia-US relations, Russian foreign policy, Russia-EU relations. He regularly consults the Russian government institutions and business enterprises on these and other issues. He is also a Senior lecturer at the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs of the National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2006, as well as Deputy Director for Research at the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy since 2004. Dmitry Suslov has co-authored several books (incl. The U.S. Policy in Asia Pacific (2014), Non-Military Instruments of the Russian Foreign Policy: Regional and Global Mechanisms (2012); Russia: a Strategy for the New World (2011); Russia vs. Europe. Confrontation or Alliance? (2009); Russia and the World. A New Epoch (2008); The World Politics (2008); The World Around Russia: 2017 (2007). At the Higher School of Economics (School of World Economy and International Affairs) he teaches courses on the US Domestic and Foreign Policy, Introduction to International Relations, Global Governance, US-Russia Relations, and Russia-EU Relations.

Global Alternatives
The goal of this programme is to analyse the content and to assess the realism of the key alternatives to the Western liberal mainstream. Alternatives are studied in the context of ideology and values. Socio-economic alternatives to the liberal mainstream of both intra-Western and extra-Western origin are another subject of analysis. The programme focuses also on political (including military-political) alternatives to the Western liberal model.
Programme director:
Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Professor of MGIMO University; Professor of the Russian Academy of Sciences

As a programme director of the Valdai Club Foundation he is сoordinating the expert programme on Global Alternatives; Academic Director of the European Studies Institute at MGIMO University since 2015; Professor at School of World Economics and Global Politics at National Research University Higher School of Economics since 2009.

Previous positions: Lecturer, History faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University (1994–1996); Senior Research Fellow, Russian Institute for Strategic Studies (1997–2004); Associate Professor, Professor at MGIMO University since 2000; Head of Directorate for Research Policy at MGIMO University (2005–2008); Head of Department of EU Politics at European Studies Institute at MGIMO University (2007–2014).

Co-author of the Valdai Discussion Club publications on ‘Creating Central Eurasia’, on relations of Russia with China and U.S., on ‘nuclear fears’ after the Ukrainian crisis. Author of 6 research monographs.
Eurasia
The goal of this programme is to form an image of Eurasia as an integral entity, and to facilitate the establishment of positive-sum game mechanisms in Greater Eurasia. The process is governed by an established trend of constructive interaction between Russia and China. The political leaders of Russia, China, Kazakhstan and countries of Central Asia have formed a fundamental understanding that realisation of any large-scale economic (including transport and logistical) projects in Eurasia are only possible with broad multilateral cooperation.
Programme director:

Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club; Director, Centre for Comprehensive European and International Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics

PhD in political sciences, Saint Petersburg State University (1999). The coauthor of more than 200 analytical materials for public authorities of the Russian Federation concerning internal development of the European Union and the Russia-EU relations in 2004–2009. Аnalytical reviews were being prepared by a working group, comprising representatives of Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Council on Foreign and Defence Policy (CFDF) and the Institute of Strategic Studies and Analysis (ISSA) and headed by Sergey Karaganov.

As a researcher specializes in Russian-European relations, foreign policy of the European Union, public-private relations in Europe, the European and international security. The author of the academic works published in Russia and abroad.
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