Alexander Arkhangelsky

Russian Federation

Literary critic; historical essayist; documentary director; columnist, RIA Novosti; author and anchor, daily intellectual talk-show “Tem vremenem” (“Those Days”), Culture channel (since 2002); professor, National Research University – Higher School of Economics (since 2006). Previous Positions: At different times he has been a radio-journalist, written for literary journals and political newspapers, and has taught. Visiting professor Geneva University (1990); professor, Centre of humanitarian knowledge, Moscow Conservatory; producer, television programs ‘Against the Tide’ (1992-1993) and ‘Chronograph’ (2002). His first book was published in 1990; since then he has written a wide range of books, ranging from literary criticism On the Front Porch: Literature and Culture During Glasnost (1991) to historical literature Pushkin’s Heroes (1991), to historical essays. The biographical novel Alexander I was published a number of times - in 2000, 2005, 2006, 2009 and in 2009 an audio version came out. It was translated into French (2000) and into Chinese (2009). His political writings were published in the collections Politically Correct (2000), Humanitarian Politics (2006), Core Aims: How to Use (2006), and Scary Fascists and Weird Jews: The Mythology of the Third Reich (2008), Tem vremenem (2010). In 2006, he debuted as a fictional author with his book 1962 (reprinted in 2007 and 2009). The book received the ‘Globe’ prize in 2007 for the ‘Best Book Written by a Journalist’. In the summer of 2008 his novel The Price of Separation was published to wide acclaim. The Russian Reporter magazine named it the ‘Most Important Novel of the Year’. Awards: ‘Power No. 4’ prize as the ‘Best Political Observer’ (2009); finalist for the television prize TEFI (2005, 2006, 2009).

Materials

How to Preserve the Moscow We Know and Love
30.10.2012
Today’s Moscow has lots of job and education opportunities to offer, but it’s no longer a place you really want to live in. The capital has become a mere collection of functions, lacking in humanity.